50 Genealogy Resources Found on Facebook

Everybody loves Facebook because it allows us to reconnect with old friends and family. Many of these people are from so far back in the past, we may have even forgotten about them until their name popped up on the recommended list. In much the same way, there are many resources on Facebook to track down your family history. Unless your family has been keeping a scrupulous record of your ancestry, chances are there are a few surprises to be found.

Genealogy has been emerging as one of the most popular pastimes in recent years, and as it is meant to do, Facebook reflects this reality. Until recently, you had to travel all over the country and/or world to have access to concrete genealogy information. Now it is available to you in your own home, with a few clicks of your mouse. There are well over 1000 pages on Facebook that are related to genealogy and ancestry research. Obviously, it would be impractical to list all of them here. Instead, we’ve decided to supply a small sampling of what can be found on Facebook.  Here’s a breakdown of 50 pages to get you started.

The Workhouse (image courtesy of Paul Townsend on flickr)

The Workhouse (image courtesy of Paul Townsend on flickr)

  1. GenealogyBank has been around for about five years now. As a division of NewsBank, Inc., a top information provider for over 35 years, they have an ever growing database of newspapers from all 50 states, dating back to 1690. Newspapers are the heart and soul of tracing your ancestry. Much information can be garnished searching through the database of obituaries, birth and wedding announcements, news articles and more. In addition, they offer access to other helpful resources, including military records, casualty lists, revolutionary and Civil War pension requests and much more. Additional contact information is available on their Facebook page.
  2. Genealogy Beginner offers an eight week class and unlimited access to live Genealogists to help you get started in your pursuit of your family heritage. This community is offered to everyone from newbies to seasoned professionals who just wish to share the wealth of their experience. They offer a wide range of research materials as well, including: a free 6-generation family tree chart, getting started lessons and tutorials and other charts, guides, and beginner research tools. If you just want to check out the community, a free, no-obligation two week trial membership is available.
  3. Sponsored by GenealogyBank, Genealogy Tip of the Day (GTotD) is a blog post maintained by genealogist Michael John Neill. It is a treasure trove of helpful hints to aid you with your genealogy search in ways you may never have considered otherwise. These include such things as not narrowing a census search to just the person in question, but encompassing close relatives as well, in case the name you are looking for doesn’t show up for some reason. Michael also gives practical tips such as watching out for poison ivy in graveyards,  and remembering that different places will have different rules for access, so you need to always ask! In addition to these helpful tips, GTotD offers links to other online resources, webinars, and a newsletter with case studies to give you more ideas you can use in your own search. The daily tips are posted on the Facebook page as well.
  4. Facebook is a great resource for finding genealogy events in your area. The study of family ancestry has become so popular that there are classes, seminars and other events happening all over the country, all the time.  Some examples of events happening at the time of the writing of this article include: Southwest Florida Germanic Genealogy Society MeetingMonaghan Genealogy Training, and Genealogy Class . While you read this, these events may  have passed, or are not happening in a location near you. However, chances are something is happening, at least in your state, in the near future. Try your own search using broad terminology to start. That is type in ‘genealogy’ and maybe your state and hit enter. When the page list comes up, narrow it to events to find what’s happening near you.
  5. RootsMagic is a software company that has been developing family-uniting software for over 20 years. They offer a number of different products. RootsMagic will help you with researching, organizing and sharing your family history. Personal Historian helps with the daunting task of translating the volumes of information you’ve collected into an interesting narrative. Both of the products are also available in the Essentials edition, which is a free version of the software, and comes with fewer features. Family Atlas is a fun way to follow your heritage around the globe, and Family Reunion Organizer will help you prepare for those special events.
  6. Genealogy Inc is a virtual smorgasbord for any level of genealogist. It is stuffed full of useful tips not only on how best to begin your search, but to keep you going throughout your ancestral pursuit. In addition, there are links to more resources and societies than you could possibly imagine. Access to birth records, marriage licenses, divorce and death records, census reports, and court, cemetery and obituary records are all available. But that’s just the beginning. Access to information is available on a state to state, and even county to county basis. Larger databases for military records and other government records are easily accessed as well.
  7. Genealogy: LOST and FOUND is a Facebook group maintained by Alicia Woolridge Morgason. This group has a more specific purpose than many of the other resources available here. Namely, this is where people can post images or information about items that they have or are looking for, that relate to family history. It is also open to browsing for those searching for items such as photographs, letters, bibles, postcards, etc. Maybe you found a box full of interesting trinkets or memorabilia at a rummage sale, antique store, or in grandma’s attic. This is a good place to try to gather more information on what you found. Or, this could turn out to be that special location where you find your own long lost treasure.
  8. Genealogy Trails is a free online resource of all sorts of genealogy related information, and extra little tidbits. Started in Illinois back in 2000, Genealogy Trails is completely staffed by volunteers. They never have been, nor will they ever be, associated with any for-profit organization. Their volunteers transcribe data from numerous sources that may be useful to those interested in unearthing their family history. In 2006, they expanded to other states. They now have websites encompassing all 50 states and Washington, D.C. They require all of their sites to have continual updates, to assure the information is fresh, and they are always looking for more eager contributors.
  9. This  Genealogy page is a simple Facebook interest page, created automatically by Facebook software, based on the interests of multiple users. First, it gives a very detailed definition of genealogy, taken from Wikipedia. The page is fleshed out with links to books, related groups and related pages. Though, in and of itself it is not a very informative source, it does serve as a good starting off point. It can give you an idea of some of the groups and pages available on Facebook that are related to genealogy. This page does not have a comprehensive list of pages in itself, but it can give you more ideas for search queries, and many of the pages offered will have good leads into family tree tracing. If you are new to the whole process, this is a good place to start.
  10. GenealogyBuff.com is a free resource of all types of records that can be useful in a genealogical search. Though it consist mostly of obituaries, it also includes marriage records, birth and death records, military records and even school yearbooks. Additional support includes a newspaper directory and research tools like the surname search tool. Extra sections are added for user-submitted data and obituaries as well as breakdowns of information by county and city. Links to each individual section of the website can be found of their Facebook information page.

    family tree (image courtesy of Broderick on flickr)

    family tree (image courtesy of Broderick on flickr)

  11. Founded in 1999, Genealogy Today offers help to those tracking their family roots in a number of ways. They provide a wiki of useful genealogy terminology, a search tool powered by the Live Roots search engine, which accesses over 200,000 sources – including major repositories like Ancestry.com, articles pertinent to those interested in – or actively pursuing – their bloodline, and a database of rare and unique information from sources like Masonic rosters, rural school and college catalogues, railroad seniority rosters, fraternal group and business member associations, all sorts of clubs and societies and more.
  12. Irish Genealogy is the official facebook page for from-ireland.net, an extensive directory of information for those interested in Irish ancestry, genealogy and family history. It is a free resource of data from Irish sources including marriage, death and birth records, photographs and more. It goes even more in depth with frequent updates, adding a variety of materials like church and court records, including interesting murder cases, funeral details and more. In addition, extra help is provided in other forms, such as instruction on cemetery and grave marker terms.
  13. The Genealogy Tree Community is actually a place to register when you try out the facetree app. This app allows you to use facebook to build your own family tree through your connections. You simply enter the information to build the “trunk” of your genealogytree-facetree, and add as much information as you can, then invite and share with family members (or your facebook family, if you prefer), to allow them to add and modify the tree, so you can watch it grow.
  14. JewishGen Genealogy is the facebook page for jewishgen.org, a non-profit organization affiliated with the Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust. JewishGen is the premiere website for Jewish genealogy. It was founded in 1987, as a bulletin board with only 150 users. Today it is powered primarily by over 700 volunteers worldwide, who contribute constantly to the ever growing database, and currently hosts more than 20 million records. In addition, they provide a series of tools and resources set up to assist those interested in tracing their Jewish ancestry.
  15. GenealogyWise has a fan page on facebook that supplies users with chat notices and a link to the site. The site itself was compiled by the National Institute for Genealogical Studies, and is actually a genealogy social network that combines community interaction with tools and resources for people interested in tracing and sharing their family history. You can set up your own page (and view others), join groups, take courses, participate in forums (and as mentioned above, informative and fun chat sessions) and view and post blogs, videos and photos and more. There is even a store for archival supplies, charts and forms, and several other genealogy related products and services.
  16. MY Genealogy Services is a full service genealogy company formed by Madeline Yanov and Karla Henderlong. Both women have experience in the legal field, and many of the investigation skills they developed in that profession aid in their current endeavor – offering research, document retrieval, family locator services, and personalized genealogy products. They have experience with inquiries in ten states, including Native American research, and tracing European lineage back to Ireland, England, Scotland, Germany, Norway, Switzerland, and Russia. These traces have gone back as far as the 17th and even 10th century. They also offer adoption research services. More information on their skills and qualifications are available on their website
  17. GenealogyMagazine.com is the current portal of Datatrace Systems. They have been producing quality genealogical research and publications since 1985. They first published American Genealogy Magazine from 1987 to 1999, and now maintain this presence on the web. The website is used as a reference for major organizations, and has been named one of the top ten online genealogy magazines. This site provides access to a large database of records and photographs, numerous publications and articles about all areas of ancestry research – including techniques, advances and people in the field – which are available both for purchase and online perusal.
  18. Genealogy Links UK is a site run by a mother and daughter team based in Lancashire, that specializes in supplying genealogical and probate research services. Utilizing databases worldwide, they can help you build your family tree, track down a missing relative or help with uncovering missing and/or unclaimed assets. Though there is no professional regulation of probate genealogists, the women of Genealogy Links UK have professional memberships with Heir Hunter and Private Investigation services, as well as belonging to the Society of Genealogy. To further comfort their customers, they are also registered with the Information Commissioner’s Office and Companies House.
  19. Olive Tree Genealogy supplies several unique databases and research tools to help you track down those hard to find relatives. They specialize in ship’s passengers lists (with ship search), and certain specific heritage lines like German Palatines, Huguenots and Walloons, Mennonites, New Netherlands (New York) and more. They also offer histories of these cultures, as well as data sources specific to each one. An array of specialized search engines is also available for users to target information lists within Olive Tree, or other databases online. Additional resources to help with your bloodline research are available as well, and best of all, it’s all free.
  20. Genealogy Freelancers offers a specialized service to people interested in tracing their family history. Their site allows you to enter the parameters of your project, and submit it to a team of professional genealogist and other ancestry specialists around the globe. These experts will then review your project and submit a bid, letting you know the price for their services. In this reverse auction method, users are able to shop for the consultants they need, at the price they want, without conducting an exhaustive web search. This makes the entire process of ancestral search that much easier by knocking down that first big hurdle – where to start.

    family tree (image courtesy of takato marui on flickr)

    family tree (image courtesy of takato marui on flickr)

  21. ‘Onward To Our Past’ Genealogy and Family History Services offers up a multitude of free genealogy tips, family history learning and ancestry fun, via Genealogical Historian, Scott Phillips. Unique resources are available for Bohemia (Czech Republic), Italy, Cornwall and Kent, the UK and US genealogical research. With his emphasis as an historian, Phillips focuses almost as much on the history of the times, society and location of the ancestors being studied as the raw data, creating a much more robust picture than traditional genealogy. With this information, and several tools and articles close at hand, ‘Onward to Our Past’ aims to make the whole process of ancestral tracking both rewarding and fun.
  22. AfriGeneas ~ African Ancestored Genealogy is one of the top sites available for African American genealogy and African ancestry research in general. They maintain huge surname and death record databases, as well as large marriage and slave record collections. In addition, census schedules, cemetery listings and an extensive document and article library are available for perusal. And to enhance the entire process, the website contains multiple forums and regular chats, and offers a number of mailing lists to create a complete and easy experience for anyone interested in tracing their African roots.
  23. Similar to finding local events, Facebook is a great resource for genealogical communities and groups. Several are regional, like Michigan Genealogy Research, Mexico Genealogy Research, Tennessee Genealogy Research, and Genealogy of Wyoming Co WV . However, these are not limited to location. Some are dedicated to a certain heritage like Irish Genealogy , German Genealogy and Norwegian Genealogy. And there are many others open to anyone and anything, like Twisted Twigs On Gnarled Branches Genealogy Again, start with a simple search for ‘genealogy’ and maybe another single word. When your results appear, narrow the search to groups and see what you find. Play with your search words for more options.
  24. West Kentucky Genealogy collects and posts research on the Jackson Purchase area of Kentucky and surrounding areas. They post the photos, ask for any information anyone may have available to help identify them, and offer them up for sale. They scan all the photos they purchase and store them in a database, to keep a digital record of them. Though they will sell CDs of photos to anyone who requests them, originals are sold only to those who have proper claim to them. That is the main purpose of the site – to return vintage photos to their rightful owners. Since most items have been purchased from auctions, antique shops and the like, in the case the family comes forth to claim their pictures, WKG asks only to be reimbursed the cost they paid for the items.
  25. findmypast UK actually began as Title Research way back in 1965, long before the concept of keeping records online was even conceived. A team of genealogists worked diligently for years tracking and transcribing records from microfiche. Years later, in 2001, the idea of transferring these records online was entertained, and after attaining the proper licensing, in 2003, the first website was launched, and became findmypast in 2006. Today, they are one of the top family history suppliers on the planet. With an ever growing database of over 1.6 billion records, and always using – and sometimes creating – cutting edge technology, they make searching for ancestry history in the UK easy and fun.
  26. Genealogy Guys Podcast is the longest running genealogy podcast in the world. It features George G. Morgan and Drew Smith. In production since 2005, the site has been listed in the top 101 best websites by Family Tree magazine in both 2012 and 2013, as well as in the top 40 blogs list in 2010 by the same magazine. Each show is an hour long, and every podcast dating back to September 2005 is available for download. They feature everything to do with genealogy – news, book reviews, interviews, and conference and product announcements. In addition, at least two main topics pertaining to ancestral searches are discussed, and listeners emails are answered. George and Drew also share their own stories, experiences and whimsy, to both teach and entertain.
  27. Ireland Genealogy Projects is a collection of websites, broken down by counties, and one for the entire country of Ireland and outlying areas. Each website varies slightly in its format and what is offered, but all are intended to help anyone trying to trace their Irish ancestry. The resources on each page include items such as: Vital records (birth, marriage, death), church records, cemetery records, court records, education, emigration, family histories, land records, military and constabulary service records, and newspapers (including obituaries). In addition, miscellaneous information and local histories are given to flesh out the picture of Irish culture and history.
  28. The Genealogy Gems Podcast is the popular online genealogy newscast hosted by Lisa Louise Cooke, the owner of Genealogy Gems, a multi-media genealogy and family history company. Lisa also works closely with Family Tree magazine, writing articles and producing and hosting the Family Tree podcast. She also works as a curriculum builder and teacher at Family Tree University. Her podcast is full of genealogy news, interviews with stars in the field, research strategies and general inspiration for aspiring genealogists in the 75 countries worldwide that receive the show. The podcasts can be found on the website (along with many more helpful resources), on itunes, and through the Genealogy Gems app and the free Genealogy Gems toolbar.
  29. Gould Genealogy is a family run business started in 1976 as a hobby by Alan and Anthea Phillips. Since then it has grown steadily into the booming behemoth it is today. They currently offer over 10,000 genealogy related products to customers living in (or with ancestors from) Australia, England, Scotland, Ireland, most of Europe and the United States. In addition to record access, they offer genealogy software and books, as well as a blog and newsletter for all the latest genealogy news. Sister sites offer information on events, services, ebooks, a family photo album and other resources – even a genealogy conference/cruise!
  30. Genealogy Researcher is a company based in Jefferson/Lewis county in New York. Tanya Stringer is a certified genealogist and member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, with over 25 years experience. She has extensive experience with histories in Canada, England and the United States, and specializes in surname research. Tanya is available for consulting, if you just need a fresh pair of eyes, or help with a brick wall. She can be more hands on as well, helping with locating documents (possibly even gravestone rubs in New York) and she even offers a complete compiling, research and organization package.

    Birth Records (image courtesy of Government & Heritage on flickr)

    Birth Records (image courtesy of Government & Heritage on flickr)

  31. Scotlands Genealogy is a good resource for people interested in their Scottish heritage. Chris Halliday is a professional genealogist based in Edinburgh. He turned a 30 year hobby into a career by earning his MA in Scottish cultural studies, and his MSc in genealogy. He also belongs to several genealogy societies and associations, and is registered for data protection. Mr. Halliday is available for helping build your family tree with both pre- and post-1855 research (1855 is when Scotland began compulsory registration of vital records), finding the history of land or property in Scotland, transcribing old Scottish documents, taking photographs of desired sites, and will even help you apply for a Scottish Coat of Arms.
  32. Israel Genealogy Research Association is a genealogy society based in Israel that is open to all. Their aim is to make documents in Israel available to people all over the world. They work with many nationalities, and in as many languages as possible. They are continuing to build a database of documents in Israel from the Ottoman period to the early years of the state of Israel, and combining it with data from countries where relatives lived before moving to Israel. They work with people outside of Israel to help them find relatives living in Israel, especially if they were separated in the Holocaust. In addition, a number of teaching aids to help people with their ancestral search are available including webinars, mentoring, hands-on visits to document archives, regional meetings and seminars.
  33. The German Genealogy Group was established in 1996 by a team of experienced genealogists to assist anyone interested in researching their Germanic ancestors. They offer easy to use database searches that are always available to anyone at anytime. For members, there are additional resources available including a monthly newsletter, a surname directory, mentoring programs, a new member pack filled with valuable information, a lending library, monthly meetings, and special events such as dinners and day trips to places of interest. The German Genealogy Group is based in Hicksville, NY. For members outside the area, some materials that are not available online can be mailed to them.
  34. Foxhound Genealogy is the family history research firm created by Joseph Fox. Based in West Virginia, Mr. Fox is available for on-site investigations in all of West Virginia, as well as parts of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. With over ten years experience, he has a strong background in West Virginia history and early American family history throughout the east coast. Free consultations are available to discuss your project needs and desires to determine the right plan of pursuit. Document lookup is available to those who just need to track down certain information on their own search, as is cemetery and grave marker photography. Adoption Search Services are available as well.
  35. Italian Family Genealogy is managed by Karen Baleno, an Italian genealogist based in Italy. She will work with clients to help unravel their family history through on-site investigations. She will supply much more than a bare bones, names and dates genealogy. Rather, she will paint a much fuller portrait of your ancestors, including their job and life before emigration, why they left, a taste of the culture and land they enjoyed while still in Italy and more. She will work with you to customize the search to your desired results. Karen is a member of several genealogical organizations including: The Association of Professional Genealogists, the New England Historical Society, Sons and Daughters of Italy and Casa Italia.
  36. Genealogy for Kids is a special mission for genealogist and founder of Generations, Jennifer Holik. She has been researching and writing about genealogy and history for over 20 years, and is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and other professional societies. In addition to extensive research and writing services, Ms. Holik offers lectures and workshops for both children and adults on various genealogical subjects. She will also work with parents, teachers, home schoolers, libraries and whomever else would like training in teaching genealogy practices to kids. In addition, Jennifer has written several books on family tree tracing. Her Branching Out series offers lessons for everyone from first graders to adults, and Engaging the Next Generation: A Guide for Genealogical Societies and Libraries was written specifically for groups interested in starting their own youth genealogical studies programs.
  37. Social Genealogy LLC is a family history research firm founded and run by Jason Victor. Jason has been conducting genealogical research for several years, but he puts an interesting twist on it, showing clients how their ancestry affects them socially, culturally and psychologically. Going beyond the bare bones of the who, where and when of a search, Jason also includes the social, cultural and psychological (including mental health and medical conditions) history of his client’s ancestors. This gives a much better picture of their lifestyles and motivations, and makes for a much fuller biographical study. Mr. Victor works closely with each individual, and under the scrutiny of their guidelines, to ensure personal satisfaction.
  38. GenealogyU is a relatively new player on the scene, having only launched in December of 2012. The idea behind the site is to create a collaborative network of contributing genealogists and family tree historians. You can sign up for the weekly newsletter or tips, tricks and how-tos for ancestral research. A focus is placed on the use of computers, the internet and improved family tree research. They are currently looking for contributing authors with genealogical experience, for both guest post and regular contributor levels of commitment. In the meantime, as the online magazine grows, the GenealogyU facebook page is updated on a regular basis, and newsletters are being sent out.
  39. Evidentia Genealogy Software helps take out much of the guess work involved in an ancestral search, and supports your research by guiding you through the Genealogical Proof Standard, by which acceptable conclusions are judged. If you have conflicting sources, Evidentia lets you view them all on one screen, so you can more easily discern the facts. If you aren’t sure about the strength or validity of a source, Evidentia can help identify the gaps in the story. Using this type of software not only makes your genealogical work easier and more fun, it gives you comfort of mind that the family tree you’ve constructed is more fact than fiction.
  40. Inishbofin Genealogy is the living result of a project Marie Coyne began almost 25 years ago, researching the families of Inishbofin, surrounding islands, mainland and overseas. She began this arduous task by traveling home-to-home in person, writing down and compiling names and information for many, many years. She then bought an online “Family Tree Maker” software package, which she diligently filled with the mountain of information she had compiled. Since that was published, it has travelled the globe and been used extensively by people with roots in Inishbofin. If you are interested in conducting your own family search, contact Ms. Coyne for information.

    Deaths (image courtesy of Government & Heritage Library, State Library of NC on flickr)

    Deaths (image courtesy of Government & Heritage Library, State Library of NC on flickr)

  41. K.B. Genealogy & Research is the company Kelly Leary founded, after discovering her passion for genealogy while uncovering some information for her grandfather’s 91st birthday. Ten years and dozens of ancestry searches later, Kelly is well versed in the techniques required for genealogy, and continually hones her skills through continuing education classes. She is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Professional Genealogists. Kelly makes sure to interweave all of the aspects of data she collects to produce the most compelling story she can create for her clients. She also specializes in assisting clients with obtaining Irish Citizenship by Descent.
  42. *****Genealogy Pieces (Family Quilt Genealogy) is an “all Inclusive” family ancestry research facebook page created by Terry Marie Varela. Posts on this page include anything and everything involved with genealogy. Terry shares information on genealogical tools, blogs, softwares, search engines, other websites, literature (both digital and not), family history stories, seminars, conventions and more.
  43. The Allen County Public Library (ACPL)  Genealogy Center in Fort Wayne, Indiana has been serving the genealogy community since 1961. The ACPL Genealogy center is a versatile and viable resource for not just the Northwest Indiana population it was initially intended to serve, but rather the entire global genealogical community. This facility not only maintains one of the largest research collections available – which incorporates data collected worldwide, but they also have a staff that specializes in genealogy and is always available to answer questions and help solve problems. This is not just some spectacular claim, ACPL actually employs eight librarians that are genealogy specialists to help you trace your personal family history.
  44. Free Genealogy Resources helps ease the financial burden of genealogy study. This site was developed by an individual who wanted to trace his roots. Before he began, he believed that his search would be very costly. As he progressed through his research, he found more and more free resources for his inquiries. He felt that it was incumbent upon him to share the knowledge he had gained in his search. In addition, he adds some tips and tricks he has come across that may save fellow genealogists some time. This in-depth blog offers many useful tips to any do-it-yourself family tree builders.
  45. Alaska Genealogy is quite simply, an extensive resource of worthwhile record resources for doing a genealogy search in Alaska. All of the records are neatly organized by county, town and record type. All sorts of records are available, including: birth records, cemetery records, census records,  church records, city directories, death records, genealogies, land records, marriage records, military records, newspapers, obituaries, probate records, school records and, of  course, vital records. The information is presented in a very straightforward and easy to access format, making it an essential resource for anyone tracing Alaskan ancestry.
  46. The Arizona Genealogical Advisory Board (AzGAB) states their mission as: “facilitating education and communication among organizations and individuals who are dedicated to the promotion of genealogy and history.” In this spirit, AzGAB aims to improve communications among genealogical societies, libraries with genealogical collections, professionals, and the general public. It is also concerned with records preservation and public access to records. Open membership is offered to all genealogical societies, groups, libraries, professionals or individuals sharing these goals. In addition to access of public records, membership in AzGAB offers a bi-monthly newsletter publishing current information, contact with other societies throughout Arizona, and knowledge of programs and seminars throughout Arizona.
  47. The Colorado Council of Genealogical Societies (CCGS) contributes to the needs of the Colorado genealogical community by supporting and contributing information to member organizations. The goals of having groups become members of this group are to encourage new and growing genealogy organizations, to promote the collection, preservation and dissemination of genealogical knowledge and information, keeping all member groups informed on upcoming events to avoid overlap, upholding genealogical standards, keeping member organizations up to date on current legislation and encouraging each member group in their individual missions. In addition to these goals and providing vital information, CCGS will sometime sponsor genealogical projects and issue awards to outstanding members.
  48. Usgenweb Archives Genealogy Project is the central domain for access for public domain records across the United States. There are links available to all state resources in both html and ftp format, as well as contact information for the individual maintaining each state’s information. As each state is individually maintained, there are some differences in format and content, but they all follow a similar template. Each state is broken down into counties, and within each county public domain records such as obituaries, marriage records, census, cemetery records, photos and many others can be found. The project is run by volunteers and provided as a free resource for genealogy research
  49. The Big Sandy River Genealogy Club was created to preserve the stories of the past, including photos and information about the pioneers and present day families who settled in the Big Sandy River watershed. Over the course of time, the focus of this group has centered primarily on counties that have or had borders on the Kentucky, Virginia and West Virginia lines. This is currently a closed group to control an overflow of extraneous information. However, membership can be attained through request and approval.
  50. Bloodlines of Salem ~ Descendants of the accused of witchcraft in 1692 is the place users can go to share information and ideas about the Salem Witch Trials (most notably those held in 1692) including those who participated and their families. Many of the members have proven direct lineage or personal relation to the participants, However, as students of the Salem Witch Trials, members are not only interested in direct lineage, but the overall implications of the event in the studies of history, law and religion. To this end, the forums are open to anyone with useful information, while the website serves as a storehouse for all the information contributed thus far.

Once again, this is very, very far from an exhaustive list. As we all have our own family trees, we all have our own requirements to find the information that pertains to us specifically. Use the Facebook search tool, and play with words and search options to find the resources that will best serve you.

Speak Your Mind

*